Not Now, Not Ever

Not Now, Not Ever

Monday, February 22, 2016

I'm Sorry But The FBI Is Acting Like A Bunch Of Children In This Spat With Apple.

I keep seeing this back and forth between Apple and the FBI in the news and it is making the FBI look really, really bad.

They can't get what they want so they are going all out with a media blitz trying to shame Apple into complying with the court order they got hit with.

At this point I hope Apple sticks one in 'em and breaks it off just on principle, let alone the Constitutional privacy issues .

FBI owes it to victims to access San Bernardino killer's phone, director says



FBI Director James Comey said late Sunday that the agency owed the victims of last December's San Bernardino terror attack a "thorough and professional investigation", in an effort to explain why law enforcement officials are trying to compel Apple to help them gain access to a cellphone owned by one of the gunmen.
In a post on the Lawfare blog, Comey wrote that the FBI "can't look the survivors in the eye, or ourselves in the mirror, if we don't follow this lead."
The post was Comey's first public statement since Apple CEO Tim Cook announced that the company would fight a federal magistrate's order to help the FBI hack into Syed Farook's work-issued iPhone. Farook, along with wife Tashfeen Malik, killed 14 people in the Dec. 2 attacks.
Cook claimed that the judge's order required Apple to "build a backdoor to the iPhone", which he described as "something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create."
The CEO said that if the technology to hack Farook's iPhone was created, it "would be the equivalent of a master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks — from restaurants and banks to stores and homes."

Snip

Comey did acknowledge in his statement that the clash has laid bare a tension between privacy and security. But he said that divide should not be resolved by the FBI nor "corporations that sell stuff for a living."

"It should be resolved by the American people deciding how we want to govern ourselves in a world we have never seen before," he said.

We've read the book Comey so we know how this ends already.


4 comments :

  1. I agree. Founder of MaCafee (sp?) already thinks that the specific phone can be dismantled and hacked by a qualified person. That gets the FBI what they need without endangering everybody's privacy.

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  2. Give the phone to apple. Apple returns phone and info. Easy Peasey.

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  3. Apple should have given the phone to the FBI when they asked for it through a warrant. By not doing so, they, Apple, is asking for all sorts of problems. If any one of us were served with a legal warrant, how far would we have gotten by refusing to answer to it. We would have been in the slammer before the next hour was out.
    Apple is acting like Mullah Obama, doing whatever the fuck they want to do, or not, and to hell with any goddam warrant.
    Scottiebill

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  4. But the Fibbies had the password, got everything that was in the phone's iCloud backup, and then Effed it up themselves, by changing the password. Then they decided there might be something that got by and wanted to look again, only to find out someone lost the new password. Maybe. It's such a preposterous story it's hard to believe.

    They (the FBI) screwed it, they own it.

    John Robb at Global Guerrillas has a piece on how what Apple is doing is better for national security than what the Gubmint wants. Back doors are how systems keep getting hacked, like how the Office of Personnel Management got the records of like EVERY government employee stolen.



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