Thursday, April 30, 2015

ACLU of California launches cellphone app to preserve videos of police

You know things are getting out of hand when the ACLU decides to stick it's neck out like this.

Because the laws concerning the videotaping of Law enforcement and people in general vary wildly from state to state, before anyone gets all trigger happy with the Smart Phone, I would absolutely recommend you become familiar with the laws concerning such things in the state you live in and any that you may visit frequently. There are general rules for the Press that you should also be aware of.


The consequences of violating these laws can be severe.

Another thing that I found while preparing this post is that there are very confusing different takes on the legality of recording police and that you should find out what your state laws say without any doubt at all.

I am all for doing whatever it takes to try and put the Genie back in the bottle when it comes to stopping police brutality and the over the top notion that police employees are above reproach and all powerful.

Nobody should consider themselves all powerful yet time after time we see police officers commit heinous offenses and get away with them.

If this ACLU cell phone app catches even one bad cop and results in the appropriate corrective action then it will be worth the effort in my opinion.

1 comment:

  1. Amazing blog and very interesting stuff you got here! I definitely learned a lot from reading through some of your earlier posts as well and decided to drop a comment on this one!

    ReplyDelete

Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one, some peoples stink more than others too. Remember, I can make your opinion disappear, you keep the stink.

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