Thursday, October 17, 2013

NSA chief and top deputy expected to depart soon

I bet he just hates having to walk away after all those billions of dollars he spent building the biggest domestic spying agency in the history of the world.
I'm sure it will look good on his resume though.


Dick.

The director of the National Security Agency and his deputy are expected to depart in the coming months
, U.S. officials said Wednesday, in a development that could give President Barack Obama a chance to reshape the eavesdropping agency.

Army General Keith Alexander's eight-year tenure was rocked this year by revelations contained in documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden about the agency's widespread scooping up of telephone, email and social-media data.

Alexander has formalized plans to leave by next March or April, while his civilian deputy, John "Chris" Inglis, is due to retire by year's end, according to U.S. officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.

One leading candidate to replace Alexander is Vice Admiral Michael Rogers, currently commander of the U.S. Navy's 10th Fleet and U.S. Fleet Cyber Command, officials told Reuters. Like the NSA, both have their headquarters at Fort Meade, Maryland, between Washington and Baltimore.

There has been no final decision on selecting Rogers to succeed Alexander, and other candidates may be considered, the officials said.

NSA spokeswoman Vanee Vines said Alexander planned to leave office in the spring after three extensions to his tenure, and the process for picking his successor was still under way.

"This has nothing to do with media leaks, the decision for his retirement was made prior; an agreement was made with the (Secretary of Defense) and the Chairman for one more year -- to March 2014," Vines told Reuters in an email.

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